May 2011 Archives

May 30, 2011

Who Will Get Your Property?

People usually do not grasp the unintended consequences of who their property will be distributed to upon their death without an estate plan of some sort.

I had a client who had dated a man for 30 years before finally giving in to his multiple proposals. Unfortunately, the man passed away within the year of their marriage. The man had an estranged daughter from a previous relationship and had not had contact with her for decades. The man owned multiple assets, including the home he lived in with my client, but because the couple was recently married, all the property was the decedent's separate property and my client did not have a community property interest in any his assets.

The man did not have an estate plan. Under the laws of intestate succession, all of his property would pass to his wife and his estranged daughter equally. Additionally, a probate would be necessary to effectuate the transfer of the assets which included multiple bank accounts and real properties to the wife and estranged daughter.

You can imagine my client's surprise and chagrin when I explained that not only would her husband's estate be subject to probate, but that his estranged daughter would need to be noticed and she would be entitled to 50% of all the assets, including the home my client had resided in with this man.

On another occasion, I met with a successful single man who was interested in estate planning. He asked me where his assets would go if he passed away without directing distribution of his property by a Will or Trust. He didn't have children and both his mother and father were living. I explained that under the succession laws of CA, his property would go to his parents in equal shares, subject to a probate proceeding.

He was mortified. It turned out that his parents were divorced and he did not have a relationship with his father in any respect whatsoever. And he explained, he would not want anything he owned passing to his father under any circumstances.

May 25, 2011

Creditors Claim Procedure for Trust Administrations

I was standing in line at the market the other day and I noticed a storyline on the first page of a weekly fan magazine that stated "Elizabeth Taylor's Estate Begins Probate." I was puzzled, and always am, when people of means, who are presumably surrounded by business people and lawyers, don't have an estate plan in effect which would, at the very least, avoid probate.

So, I did a little research. It turns out that the estate is not being probated. Ms. Taylor had a revocable trust at the time of her death. However, the attorneys for the trust opted for a court proceeding which is commonly referred to as a Creditor's Claim process for trust administrations.

The probate court has jurisdiction over trust matters. The Creditors Claim process brought in a trust administration is voluntarily filed in the probate court. The Creditors Claim process in a probate is mandatory.

After receiving notice, if a creditor does not file a timely claim against the trust (within 4 months of published notice or 60 days from date notice is mailed or from date of personal service, whichever is later) the creditor's claim would be barred.

There are numerous benefits for opting to initiating the Creditors Claim process in court for a trust administration. The procedure limits the 1 year limitations period in which creditors would otherwise have to file claims, it will force noticed creditors to pursue their claims, or not, allowing the administration of the trust to move ahead without fear of a lurking outstanding claim, if a claim is questionable it can be addressed in a limited period and distributees don't need to worry about a properly noticed creditor pursuing the claim against the beneficiary's inheritance from the decedent's trust .

May 22, 2011

Choosing Taxation Plans for Decedents Who Died in 2010

There is an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal discussing which taxation system to choose for those taxpayers who passed away in 2010. The choice is between the estate tax system or the modified carry-over basis rules initially in place in 2010 when the estate tax was phased out.

Previous law gradually reduced federal estate tax over the years and eliminated it altogether for decedent's dying in 2010 subject to carry-over basis rules which could result in income/capital gains taxation. In 2011, the estate tax was to be applied to assets in a decedent's estate over $1 million at a rate of 55%.

New law, the 2010 Tax Relief Act increases the exemption amount to $5 million for 2011 and 2012 and is retroactive to January 1, 2010. Representatives for estates of decedent's dying in 2010 can choose between the estate tax scheme or no estate tax subject to the modified carry-over basis laws.

If the estate tax option is applied, the estate will be subject to the $5 million applicable exclusion amount at the top tax rate of 35% with a stepped-up basis. If the no estate tax regimen is applied the modified carryover basis rules with be in effect.

May 2, 2011

Who Would Receive Your Property if Your Testamentary Transfer is to a Disqualified Transferee Under California's Care Custodian Statute?: Part IV

In August 2010, SB 105 was passed by the legislature. There is a new Probate Code Section (21362) updating the previous definition of "care custodian." This Section addresses gifts that become irrevocable after January 1, 2011.

This Code states that a care custodian will no longer include "a person who provided services without remuneration if the person had a personal relationship with the dependent adult (1) at least 90 days before providing those services, (2) at least 6 months before the dependent adult's death, and (3) before the dependent adult was admitted to hospice care, if the dependent adult was admitted to hospice care."

And if all this is too confusing, or you are not certain if a gift will be disqualified under the statute, an independent attorney can provide a Certificate of Independent Review.

A Certificate of Independent Review mandates an attorney that is, well, obviously independent from the situation to counsel the client regarding the "nature and consequences of the intended transfer." Under California Probate Code 21370, the independent attorney is described as an attorney who "has no legal, business, financial, professional, or personal relationship with the beneficiary of a donative transfer at issue under this part, and who would not be appointed as a fiduciary or receive any pecuniary benefit as a result of the operation of the instrument containing the donative transfer at issue under this part."